ROSWELL DAILY RECORD, VERY IMPORTANT INFO


RAAF CAPTURES FLYING SAUCER ON RANCH IN ROSWELL REGION

Roswell Daily Record, Tuesday, July 8, 1947.

DO YOU REMEMBER?

No Details of
Flying Disk
Are Revealed
Roswell Hardware
Man and Wife
Report Disk Seen
The intelligence office of the 509th Bombardment group at Roswell Army Air Field announced at noon today, that the field has come into possession of a flying saucer.

According to information released by the department, over authority of Maj. J. A. Marcel, intelligence officer, the disk was recovered on a ranch in the Roswell vicinity, after an unidentified rancher had notified Sheriff Geo. Wilcox, here, that he had found the instrument on his premises.

Major Marcel and a detail from his department went to the ranch and recovered the disk, it was stated.

After the intelligence officer here had inspected the instrument it was flown to higher headquarters.

The intelligence office stated that no details of the saucer’s construction or its appearance had been revealed.

Mr. and Mrs. Dan Wilmot apparently were the only persons in Roswell who seen what they thought was a flying disk.

They were sitting on their porch at 105 South Penn. last Wednesday night at about ten o’clock when a large glowing object zoomed out of the sky from the southeast, going in a northwesterly direction at a high rate of speed.

Wilmot called Mrs. Wilmot’s attention to it and both ran down into the yard to watch. It was in sight less then a minute, perhaps 40 or 50 seconds, Wilmot estimated.

Wilmot said that it appeared to him to be about 1,500 feet high and going fast. He estimated between 400 and 500 miles per hour.

In appearance it looked oval in shape like two inverted saucers, faced mouth to mouth, or like two old type washbowls placed, together in the same fashion. The entire body glowed as though light were showing through from inside, though not like it would inside, though not like it would be if a light were merely underneath.

From where he stood Wilmot said that the object looked to be about 5 feet in size, and making allowance for the distance it was from town he figured that it must have been 15 to 20 feet in diameter, though this was just a guess.

Wilmot said that he heard no sound but that Mrs. Wilmot said she heard a swishing sound for a very short time.

The object came into view from the southeast and disappeared over the treetops in the general vicinity of six mile hill.

Wilmot, who is one of the most respected and reliable citizens in town, kept the story to himself hoping that someone else would come out and tell about having seen one, but finally today decided that he would go ahead and tell about it. The announcement that the RAAF was in possession of one came only a few minutes after he decided to release the details of what he had seen.
W. W. Brazel, 48, Lincoln county rancher living 30 miles south of Corona, today told his story of finding what the army at first described as a flying disk, but the publicity which attended his find caused him to add that if he ever found anything else short of a bomb, he sure wasn’t going to say anything about it.

Brazel was brought here late yesterday by W. E. Whitmore, of radio station KGFL, had his picture taken and gave an interview to the Record and Jason Kellahin, sent here from the Albuquerque bureau of the Associated Press to cover the story. The picture he posed for was sent out over AP telephoto wire sending machine specially set up in the Record office by R. D. Adair, AP wire chief sent here from Albuquerque for the sole purpose of getting out his picture and that of sheriff George Wilcox, to whom Brazel originally gave the information of his find.

Brazel related that on June 14 he and an 8-year old son, Vernon, were about 7 or 8 miles from the ranch house of the J. B. Foster ranch, which he operates, when they came upon a large area of bright wreckage made up on rubber strips, tinfoil, a rather tough paper and sticks.

At the time Brazel was in a hurry to get his round made and he did not pay much attention to it. But he did remark about what he had seen and on July 4 he, his wife, Vernon and a daughter, Betty, age 14, went back to the spot and gathered up quite a bit of the debris.

The next day he first heard about the flying disks, and he wondered if what he had found might be the remnants of one of these.

Monday he came to town to sell some wool and while here he went to see sheriff George Wilcox and “whispered kinda confidential like” that he might have found a flying disk.

Wilcox got in touch with the Roswell Army Air Field and Maj. Jesse A. Marcel and a man in plain clothes accompanied him home, where they picked up the rest of the pieces of the “disk” and went to his home to try to reconstruct it.

According to Brazel they simply could not reconstruct it at all. They tried to make a kite out of it, but could not do that and could not find any way to put it back together so that it could fit.

Then Major Marcel brought it to Roswell and that was the last he heard of it until the story broke that he had found a flying disk.

Brazel said that he did not see it fall from the sky and did not see it before it was torn up, so he did not know the size or shape it might have been, but he thought it might have been about as large as a table top. The balloon which held it up, if that was how it worked, must have been about 12 feet long, he felt, measuring the distance by the size of the room in which he sat. The rubber was smoky gray in color and scattered over an area about 200 yards in diameter.

When the debris was gathered up the tinfoil, paper, tape, and sticks made a bundle about three feet long and 7 or 8 inches thick, while the rubber made a bundle about 18 or 20 inches long and about 8 inches thick. In all, he estimated, the entire lot would have weighed maybe five pounds.

There was no sign of any metal in the area which might have been used for an engine and no sign of any propellers of any kind, although at least one paper fin had been glued onto some of the tinfoil.

There were no words to be found anywhere on the instrument, although there were letters on some of the parts. Considerable scotch tape and some tape with flowers printed upon it had been used in the construction.

No strings or wire were to be found but there were some eyelets in the paper to indicate that some sort of attachment may have been used.

Brazel said that he had previously found two weather observation balloons on the ranch, but that what he found this time did not in any way resemble either of these.

“I am sure that what I found was not any weather observation balloon,” he said. “But if I find anything else besides a bomb they are going to have a hard time getting me to say anything about it.”

WHAT WENT UNREPORTED:

Brazel lived on the ranch alone. None of his family lived on the ranch at all — which had no phone, running water, or electricity — but actually lived over one hundred miles away in the little town of Tularosa, near Alamogordo. (more)
Before EITHER of the July 8th or July 9th “news” articles were published in the Daily Record it was known Brazel, who basically lived in a ramshackle ranch house eight miles from his nearest neighbor and had no telephone, electricity or running water, was picked up from his ranch and taken to the house of the owner of the local Roswell radio station, KGFL, to be interviewed. A wire recording of the interview was made, but because KGFL had signed off for the day the station planned to broadcast it the next morning. Before it could be used Brazel was taken into custody by members of the military police and his exclusive interview confiscated. The Federal Communications Commission (reported to have been through the office of T.J. Slowie, secretary of the Commission, but never admitted to by himself or confirmed by the Commission) warned station personnel that the matter involved national security and should KGFL air any portion of his interview, or issue any information regarding it, they would lose their broadcasting license. Sometime later Brazel showed up at KGFL escorted by military officers, where he then told the “truth” about the debris found on his ranch. Brazel refuted his initial story, claiming now, after being taken into custody and while STILL under custody, that he first found the debris MID-JUNE, 1947 and NOT on the morning of Saturday, July 5, 1947, and that it was simply a weather balloon.

 
NOTE: The problem with the earlier mid-June date for being the first time finding the debris rather than the later July 5th date is that Tommy Tyree, a ranch-hand that worked on and off for Brazel AFTER the crash, is on record as saying that Brazel complained to him regularly over and over — and to others as well it has been reported — how the day he found the material scattered all over the ranch he had been forced to circle his sheep a mile or more around the area to water because they refused to cross the debris field. It doesn’t make sense, nor is it likely given the average temperature in Corona is 87 degrees and rising in June, that Brazel would leave material scattered all over his ranch from mid-June to early July that frightened his fully wool-covered sheep so much they wouldn’t even go to water on their own, but had to be physically driven just to get a drink. Not only would he be highly remiss in his duties, he would also be putting his livelihood as well as the sheep’s lives in danger.

 
Continuing, in the second paragraph of the newspaper article above, dated Wednesday, July 9, 1947 the following is presented:
Brazel was brought here late yesterday by W. E. Whitmore, of radio station KGFL, had his picture taken and gave an interview to the Record and Jason Kellahin, sent here from the Albuquerque bureau of the Associated Press to cover the story.
In that the article was published in the Wednesday paper, Brazel being brought “here late yesterday” (i.e., the KGFL radio station) translates into him being brought to the station late afternoon or early evening on Tuesday, July 8th. However, unlike how it is written in the paper, he was actually picked up from his ranch not on Tuesday but late afternoon or early evening of Monday, July 7th and taken to the house of the owner of KGFL for the interview. What the article does is simply ignore the Monday afternoon interview (when the wire recording was made, then confiscated) as being non-existant and jumps to the interview of the next day where Brazel showed up at at the station escorted by military officers and then told the “truth” about what he had either found or saw on his ranch.

He also claimed that it was on Friday morning, July 4, 1947 — by all accounts BEFORE the object came down except for, of course, his surrogate response that was being reported NOW at the time in the above article — that he, his wife Maggie (Margaret), age 45, son Vernon, age 8, and daughter Betty (Bessie Brazel Schreiber), age 14 — none of whom lived on the ranch at all, but who actually lived over one hundred miles away in the little town of Tularosa, near Alamogordo — accompanied him to the debris field and gathered up as much of the scattered material as they could carry. The article goes on to say Brazel heard about flying disks for the first time on the next day, Saturday, then only on MONDAY after letting all day Sunday slip by, did he go into Roswell to sell some wool or possibly sell, trade or buy a new truck, taking a few pieces of debris with him to show to the sheriff.

Regardless of the above published July 9th accounting, or re-accounting as the case may be, it was NOT on Friday, July 4th, but ON the morning of the NEXT day, Saturday, July 5th, and WITHOUT his family — but accompanied instead by the son of neighbors, William D. (sometimes Timothy) “Dee” Proctor, age seven — that Brazel came across the debris for the first time.

It is known Brazel went into the town of Corona sometime Saturday afternoon to do some shopping and, not unusual for him, stopped by the only watering hole in town, Wade’s Bar and pool hall — possibly for a cold beer, BS with his uncle (sometimes brother-in-law) Hollis Wilson and fellow ranchers to get caught up on local gossip. There he overheard or was told the topic de jur about the recent flying saucer sightings in the Pacific Northwest and more recently in Arizona. A few days before a man and his son (actually nephew, (see)) on the way through town stopped to get some water for an overheated truck and tighten or replace a broken or loose fanbelt. While waiting for the truck to cool down, with some time to spare, the two sat in the shade drinking a couple of iced cold sodas. In the process a local merchant or rancher stopped by to see if he could help. He took-up conversation with the man and in a general, small talk sort of way, asked where they were headed and how the trip was going. The man said he and the boy had visited Elden Pueblo where a rare meteorite had been buried by prehistoric Native Americans in a ritual style then to Meteor Crater and were now on their way to Fort Sumner to see Billy the Kid’s gravesite. Somehow the topic veered away from meteors and meteorites to the flying saucers that had been sighted the week before in Washington state. The man, who had basically been in the backcountry for the past few weeks, said it was the first he had heard of such things. Then taking a stick, he began drawing a nearly circular figure in the dirt. Pointing to the finished rendition he related that he and the boy had been run off the road “by two of the damn things” near Williams, Arizona just a couple of days before.

 

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